How to get a Bearer Token from Citrix Cloud for API access, using PowerShell

Wanted to share a quick PowerShell code snippet.

I used this to get a Bearer Token from the Citrix Cloud API trust service using PowerShell.

It’s not beautiful, but it gets the job done.

Ingredients

You’ll need:

  • The clientID and clientSecret from your Citrix Cloud customer API client (how to do that is here)
  • Your customerID for your Citrix Cloud instance

Then put those in-between the relevant quotation marks in the code snippet 🙂

PowerShell code snippet

 

 

The Secret Citrix SysAdmins – My first Citrix blog post

Hoorah – a year in, and I’ve finally gotten around to writing something about what we do in the RTST team at Citrix.

If you’re curious about what we do, you can read it over on the official Citrix Blogs site: The Secret Citrix SysAdmins

Getting the Bosch Accelerometer to work on Chuwi Hi 8 Windows 10 Anniversary Edition

The short version

If you get the error “Device cannot start” on your Bosch Accelerometer in Device Manager on a Chuwi Hi 8 after installing Windows 10 Anniversary Edition, try this:

  1. Get the 32-bit Hi 8 Pro and Vi 8 Pro drivers. Look for the text “Chuwi Hi8 Pro Dualboot driver_32bit download”
  2. Install the driver in the ??-gravity folder
  3. Double-check that the driver didn’t get a “cannot start” error
  4. Reboot

This device may also be known as:

  • ACPI\VEN_BOSC&DEV_0200
  • ACPI\BOSC0200
  • BMA2x2

The longer version

AKA, how to fix the rotation and orientation feature in Windows 10 Anniversary Edition on Chuwi Hi 8.

I recently wiped my Chuwi Hi 8 tablet so that I could install Windows 10 Anniversary Edition. AE won’t install via Windows Update, because it requires more disk space than is available on a dual-boot Chuwi Hi 8.

After grabbing the Drivers from the official source and installing them, I had one “Unknown Device” in Device Manager with the Hardware ID BOSC0200. Eventually I managed to force install the G-SENSOR driver provided by Chuwi from the link above, but the device would never start, meaning the auto-rotation feature would never work.

This means that the Rotation/Orientation feature of Windows 10 won’t work. Your tablet will be stuck in Portrait mode unless you manually rotate it in the Settings > Display.

After a few days and many hours of trying to source a driver that would work, I finally discovered that if you download the Hi8 Pro model’s drivers labelled Driver: Chuwi Hi8 Pro Dualboot driver_32bit download” from here, and install the driver that’s inside the folder ??-gravity” – it works!

chuwi-bosch-fix

An update on the poor customer service from Microsoft Band support

Be warned: this is a Whinge-piece.

I wanted to provide an update on the poor customer service I’ve been receiving from Microsoft UK Support with my original Microsoft Band.

Microsoft seemingly ignored my “escalated complaint” through resolver.co.uk that I raised in December 2015, so I raised a new service ticket before the 1 year anniversary of my Band purchase, around March 2016. In May 2016, Microsoft got back to me, and then promptly (again) told me that I wasn’t eligible for a replacement because they believe I damaged this myself (I definitely didn’t) and that the damage they witnessed isn’t covered by the warranty.

I have multiple issues with this whole saga, and Microsoft’s behaviour in general:

  1. Accusing a customer of purposely damaging an item is pretty poor form.
  2. Microsoft voided my warranty without even contacting me to understand the damage or allow me any kind of response.
  3. Microsoft rejected my request to refund me or replace my Band with a Band 2, which has been designed to avoid the issues I’ve seen with my original Band.
  4. Microsoft ignored my complaint through Resolver.co.uk
  5. I hate having to use the law, but Microsoft Support seem to be ignoring The Sale of Goods Act 1979 (as amended) which states that goods should be as described, of a satisfactory quality and fit for purpose. The Band in my possession, is absolutely not fit for purpose given the wear and tear it’s sustained since I purchased it.

I’ve probably said this before but, I love my Band, and have been a fan of Microsoft for a long time. However, this series of incidents has genuinely sullied my opinion of Microsoft. Shame, really.

My Band, after less than a year of use
My Band, after less than a year of use

Microsoft Band: An exercise in appalling customer service

Update on 2016-05-18: An update on the saga is here: An update on the poor customer service from Microsoft Band support


Update on 2015-12-11. I used resolver.co.uk and Microsoft didn’t respond in 14 days, so I’ve escalated the case. Apparently this goes to Satya Nadella, but I’m not convinced he really has time to deal with customer service complaints 🙂 Hopefully I’ll hear some positive news soon.


Original from November 2015: You may have seen me recently tweet about my ongoing Microsoft Band issue. Basically, it started falling apart after less than 7 months worth of use. I paid £169.99 for the Band back in April, and I feel a 24/7 fitness device should last significantly longer than that before it starts falling apart. In the UK we have some laws that govern this stuff, and I’m frankly appalled that I’ve had to start quoting those laws and (attempting to) exercise them. Most companies I’ve dealt with in the past are fantastic when devices exhibit faults early in their life and replace items with no quibbles. Not Microsoft, it seems.